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Monthly Archives: January 2016

Introducing The Cardiovascular Institute Online Learning Academy where daily lectures are given by Dr.  Ben-Zur will be available fror viewing. Though these lectures are primarily for health care providers we encourage anyone interested to watch. This is a free service.

Please visit the following link to go to the learning academy: http://drbenzur.com/category/online-learning-center/

Please feel free to email us at ubenzurmd@gmail.com for any more information or if you would like a specific lecture series about a topic that you would like to hear more about.
Thank you so much!

On behalf of the FDA, Dr. Uri Ben-Zur and The Cardiovascular Institute would like to inform you of a recently approved drug for lowering cholesterol and treating patients with heart disease.

The brand name of the medication is Praluent ®. The generic name is alirocumab.

This drug was approved on July 24, 2015 and works to decrease levels of our body’s “bad cholesterol” also called “LDL” cholesterol. It is a second line drug for patients who cannot tolerate statin therapy or those who have not been able to lower their LDL cholesterol enough with statins.

According to the FDA, the efficacy and safety of Praluent were evaluated in five placebo-controlled trials, involving 2,476 participants exposed to Praluent. Participants taking Praluent had an average reduction in LDL cholesterol ranging from 36 to 59 percent, compared to placebo.

The most common side effects of Praluent include itching, swelling, pain, or bruising where injection is given, nasopharyngitis, and flu. Allergic reactions, such as rashes and skin discolorations can also occur.

So if you have a history of heart disease, please come visit or call us 818.986.0911, and ask us about Praluent today!

For more information visit:  http://www.regeneron.com/Praluent

 

Sincerely,

 

Uri M. Ben-Zur, M.D., F.A.C.C.

 

Dr. Ben-Zur is a interventional cardiologist in Tarzana and Encino. He performs Atrial Fibrillation ablations as well as Atrial Flutter Ablations. He is open from 6 AM to 3 PM 6 days a week.

olc

Welcome to the Cardiovascular Institute’s Online Learning Center where you’ll experience quality medical education at your convenience. The online learning center is one aspect of how we are changing the face of medical education. Students are often thrown into the world of medicine with little direction and guidance. One can say that students are often seen but not heard.  It is undoubtedly more difficult to learn medicine in a competitive environment.

Here at the Cardiovascular Institute we want to nurture a healthy and open learning atmosphere. We want students to cultivate their minds and develop their skills their full potential. Medical students have mastered the art of regurgitating numbers and facts from books. Our desire is for students to truly grasp the art of medicine, to learn patient care in addition to the science behind the disease. Here we created a space where students are given opportunities to learn from not only books but experts in their field. We encourage students to start applying their skills early with each patient they encounter while building an environment that fosters a cohesive and empowering education.

Our innovative and engaging online environment for healthcare education is comprised of a catalog of our online and onsite healthcare education courses. The Learning Center contains courses offered by the Cardiovascular Institute and our network of physicians, clinicians, top medical students, and professional associations from around the world. We offer hundreds of presentations on board-relevant topics and other topics relevant to nurses, radiologic technologists, sonographers, and other healthcare professionals. In addition to the many opportunities for students to learn while at the clinic or hospital, we have developed another resource in which they can learn straight from other physicians and experts. Students are encouraged to watch these videos, discuss them with their peers and ask questions.

Our hope is to harbor an environment in which students actively engage in the learning process, not just individually, but as a group. Students are encouraged to build off of each other’s knowledge, enabling them to grow exponentially more than if they were on their own.

Click here to visit the New Online Learning Center

7 Things That Happen When You Stop Eating Meat

People go plant-based for lots of reasons. These include losing weight, feeling more energetic, reducing the risk of heart disease, decreasing the number of pills they take … there are dozens of great reasons! For even more inspiration, check out these other benefits you can expect when you go plant-based.

1. You’ll reduce inflammation in your body.

If you are eating meat, cheese, and highly processed foods, chances are you have elevated levels of inflammation in your body. While short-term inflammation (such as after an injury) is normal and necessary, inflammation that lasts for months or years is not. Chronic inflammation has been linked to the development of atherosclerosis, heart attacks, strokes, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases, among other conditions.
In contrast, plant-based diets are naturally anti-inflammatory, because they are high in fiber, antioxidants, and other phytonutrients, and much lower in inflammatory triggers like saturated fat and endotoxins (toxins released from bacteria commonly found in animal foods). Studies have shown that people who adopt plant-based diets can dramatically lower their level of C-reactive protein (CRP), an indicator of inflammation in the body.

2. Your blood cholesterol levels will plummet.

Elevated blood cholesterol is a key risk factor for heart disease and strokes, two of the leading killers in the United States. Saturated fat—primarily found in meat, poultry, cheese, and other animal products—is a major driver of our blood cholesterol levels. Cholesterol in our food also plays a role.
Studies consistently show that when people go plant based, their blood cholesterol levels drop by up to 35% . In many cases, the decrease is equal to that seen with drug therapy—with many positive side effects! People who require cholesterol-lowering drugs can further slash their cholesterol levels and cardiovascular risk by adopting a plant-based diet.
Whole-food, plant-based diets reduce blood cholesterol because they tend to be very low in saturated fat and they contain zero cholesterol. Moreover, plant-based diets are high in fiber, which further reduces blood cholesterol levels. Soy has also been shown to play a role in lowering cholesterol, for those who choose to include it.

3. You’ll give your microbiome a makeover.

The trillions of microorganisms living in our bodies are collectively called the microbiome. Increasingly, these microorganisms are recognized as crucial to our overall health: not only do they help us digest our food, but they produce critical nutrients, train our immune systems, turn genes on and off, keep our gut tissue healthy, and help protect us from cancer. Studies have also shown they play a role in obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, autoimmune disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and liver disease.
Plant foods help shape a healthy intestinal microbiome. The fiber in plant foods promotes the growth of “friendly” bacteria in our guts. On the other hand, fiber-poor diets (such as those that are high in dairy, eggs, and meat) can foster the growth of disease-promoting bacteria. Landmark studies have shown that when omnivores eat choline or carnitine (found in meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, and dairy), gut bacteria make a substance that is converted by our liver to a toxic product called TMAO. TMAO leads to worsening cholesterol plaques in our blood vessels and escalates the risk of heart attack and stroke.
Interestingly, people eating plant-based diets make little or no TMAO after a meat-containing meal, because they have a totally different gut microbiome. It takes only a few days for our gut bacterial patterns to change – the benefits of a plant-based diet start quickly!

4. You’ll change your how your genes work.

Scientists have made the remarkable discovery that environmental and lifestyle factors can turn genes on and off. For example, the antioxidants and other nutrients we eat in whole plant foods can change gene expression to optimize how our cells repair damaged DNA. Research has also shown that lifestyle changes, including a plant-based diet, can decrease the expression of cancer genes in men with low-risk prostate cancer. We’ve even seen that a plant-based diet, along with other lifestyle changes, can lengthen our telomeres—the caps at the end of our chromosomes that help keep our DNA stable. This might mean that our cells and tissues age more slowly, since shortened telomeres are associated with aging and earlier death.

5. You’ll dramatically reduce your chances of getting type 2 diabetes.

An estimated 38% of Americans have prediabetes—a precursor to type 2 diabetes. Animal protein, especially red and processed meat, has been shown in study after study to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. In the Adventist population, omnivores have double the rate of diabetes compared with vegans, even accounting for differences in body weight. In fact, in this population, eating meat once a week or more over a 17-year period increased the risk of diabetes by 74%! Similarly, in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses Health Study, increasing red meat intake by more than just half a serving per day was associated with a 48% increased risk in diabetes over 4 years.
Why would meat cause type 2 diabetes? Several reasons: animal fat, animal-based (heme) iron, and nitrate preservatives in meat have been found to damage pancreatic cells, worsen inflammation, cause weight gain, and impair the way our insulin functions.
You will dramatically lessen your chances of getting type 2 diabetes by leaving animal products off of your plate and eating a diet based in whole plant foods. This is especially true if you eat whole grains, which are highly protective against type 2 diabetes. You read that right: carbs actually protect you from diabetes! Also, a plant-based diet can improve or even reverse your diabetes if you’ve already been diagnosed.

6. You’ll get the right amount—and the right type—of protein.

The average omnivore in the US gets more than 1.5 times the optimal amount of protein, most of it from animal sources.
Contrary to popular perception, this excess protein does not make us stronger or leaner. Excess protein is stored as fat or turned into waste, and animal protein is a major cause of weight gain, heart disease,diabetes, inflammation, and cancer.
On the other hand, the protein found in whole plant foods protects us from many chronic diseases. There is no need to track protein intake or use protein supplements with plant-based diets; if you are meeting your daily calorie needs, you will get plenty of protein. The longest-lived people on Earth, those living in the “Blue Zones,” get about 10% of their calories from protein, compared with the US average of 15-20%.

7. You’ll make a huge impact on the health of our planet and its inhabitants.

Animal agriculture is extremely destructive to the planet. It is the single largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, and is a leading cause of land and water use, deforestation, wildlife destruction, and species extinction. About 2,000 gallons of water are needed to produce just one pound of beef in the U.S. Our oceans are rapidly becoming depleted of fish; by some estimates, oceans may be fishless by 2048. The current food system, based on meat and dairy production, also contributes to world hunger—the majority of crops grown worldwide go toward feeding livestock, not feeding people.
Equally important, animals raised for food are sentient beings who suffer, whether raised in industrial factory farms or in farms labeled “humane.” Eating a plant-based diet helps us lead a more compassionate life. After all, being healthy is not just about the food we eat; it’s also about our consciousness—our awareness of how our choices affect the planet and all of those with whom we share it.

The Cardiovascular Institute, founded by Uri M. Ben-Zur, M.D., F.A.C.C, is located in the heart of San Fernando Valley in Tarzana, California. In close proximity to, Encino, Sherman Oaks, Burbank, Calabasas and West Hills. Our practice is open to patients and future medical professionals Sunday through Friday starting at 6AMdaily. We are committed to enhancing the quality of healthcare for all of the residents of the Greater Los Angeles area. Dr. Ben-Zur is an attending physician at Providence Tarzana Medical Center. He offers a wide variety of cardiac services. Radiofrequency ablations for cardiac arrhythmias, pacemaker implantation, coronary stent placement and angioplasty are some of the many procedures we specialize in. As an expert onhypertension, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, and arrhythmias, Dr. Ben-Zur is able to diagnose and treat patients in our new state of the art facility. Almost 60 million Americans suffer from hypertension and cardiovascular related diseases. Due to the nature of these diseases, most patients go undiagnosed until it is too late. Diagnosing these diseases early in life can dramatically decrease the risk for future complications. We are always welcoming new patients for heart related screening and have same day appointments available. Additionally, at the Cardiovascular Institute of Tarzana, California, Dr. Ben-Zur’s staff serves patients in multiple languages! Whether it be Hebrew, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Armenian, Tagalog, Hindi, Urdu, and many more the Cardiovascular Institute will often have someone to serve your language and heart health needs.
Our practice is fortified by his acceptance of medical professionals and ultrasound technicians from various organizations including Western University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, and UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and the University of Southern California. The Institute fosters an ideal environment for future physicians and local technicians to help the unique population of the Greater Los Angeles area. Including, Tazana, Encino, Burbank, Sherman OaksWest Hills, and Calabasas.
Dr. Ben-Zur’s past medical education in electrophysiology and angioplasty is unparalleled. Guided by pioneers in both fields early in his career, he has had the opportunity to gain experience in major academic centers in New York City and San Diego, California. Many of his research projects are featured in various medical journals such as The New England Journal of Medicine and The Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Furthermore, Dr. Ben-Zur has multiple publications for his patients to learn more about their health and how they can prevent diseases by improving their lifestyle through diet and exercise. Our newest publication can be found on our website under patient resources!
This holiday season,be mindful of your health. Stress and overindulgence may put your body at risk for serious cardiac problems. A study by the Heart Institute states there are 33% more cardiovascular events from ischemic heart disease in December and January than the rest of the year in Los Angeles County. We advocate for our patients to familiarize themselves with the signs of acute coronary syndrome. The quicker symptoms are recognized, the better the outcomes. We encourage you to explore our website for more information about our practice!

Sources:
Barbaresko, J., Koch, M., Schulze, M., & Nöthlings, U. (2013). Dietary pattern analysis and biomarkers of low-grade inflammation: A systematic literature review. Nutr Rev Nutrition Reviews, 511-527.
Barnard, N., Levin, S., & Trapp, C. (2014). Meat Consumption as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes. Nutrients, 897-910.
Bøhn, S., Myhrstad, M., Thoresen, M., Holden, M., Karlsen, A., Tunheim, S., . . . Blomhoff, R. (n.d.). Blood cell gene expression associated with cellular stress defense is modulated by antioxidant-rich food in a randomised controlled clinical trial of male smokers. BMC Medicine BMC Med, 54-54.
David, L., Maurice, C., Carmody, R., Gootenberg, D., Button, J., Wolfe, B., . . . Turnbaugh, P. (2013). Diet rapidly and reproducibly alters the human gut microbiome. Nature, 559-563.
Dean, E., & Gormsen Hansen, R. (2012). Prescribing Optimal Nutrition and Physical Activity as “First-Line” Interventions for Best Practice Management of Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation Associated with Osteoarthritis: Evidence Synthesis. Arthritis2012, 1-28. doi:10.1155/2012/560634
Ferdowsian, H., & Barnard, N. (n.d.). Effects of Plant-Based Diets on Plasma Lipids. The American Journal of Cardiology, 947-956.
Goldsmith, J., & Sartor, R. (2014). The role of diet on intestinal microbiota metabolism: Downstream impacts on host immune function and health, and therapeutic implications. Journal of Gastroenterology J Gastroenterol, 785-798.
Halkjær, J., Olsen, A., Overvad, K., Jakobsen, M. U., Boeing, H., Buijsse, B., … Tjønneland, A. (2010). Intake of total, animal and plant protein and subsequent changes in weight or waist circumference in European men and women: the Diogenes project. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord35(8), 1104-1113. doi:10.1038/ijo.2010.254
Huang, T., Yang, B., Zheng, J., Li, G., Wahlqvist, M. L., & Li, D. (2012). Cardiovascular Disease Mortality and Cancer Incidence in Vegetarians: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism60(4), 233-240. doi:10.1159/000337301
Jenkins, D. (2003). Effects of a Dietary Portfolio of Cholesterol-Lowering Foods vs Lovastatin on Serum Lipids and C-Reactive Protein. JAMA, 502-502.
Menke, A., Casagrande, S., Geiss, L., & Cowie, C. (2015). Prevalence of and Trends in Diabetes Among Adults in the United States, 1988-2012. JAMA, 1021-1021.
Ornish, D., Magbanua, M., Weidner, G., Weinberg, V., Kemp, C., Green, C., . . . Carroll, P. (2008). Changes in prostate gene expression in men undergoing an intensive nutrition and lifestyle intervention. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 8369-8374.
Ornish, D., Lin, J., Chan, J., Epel, E., Kemp, C., Weidner, G., . . . Blackburn, E. (n.d.). Effect of comprehensive lifestyle changes on telomerase activity and telomere length in men with biopsy-proven low-risk prostate cancer: 5-year follow-up of a descriptive pilot study. The Lancet Oncology, 1112-1120.
Tonstad, S., Butler, T., Yan, R., & Fraser, G. (2009). Type of Vegetarian Diet, Body Weight, and Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Care, 791-796.
Pan, A., Sun, Q., Bernstein, A. M., Manson, J. E., Willett, W. C., & Hu, F. B. (2013). Changes in Red Meat Consumption and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. JAMA Internal Medicine173(14), 1328. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.6633
Sutliffe, J., Wilson, L., Heer, H., Foster, R., & Carnot, M. (n.d.). C-reactive protein response to a vegan lifestyle intervention. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 32-37.
Tonstad, S., Butler, T., Yan, R., & Fraser, G. (2009). Type of Vegetarian Diet, Body Weight, and Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Care, 791-796.
Van Nielen, M., Feskens, E. J., Mensink, M., Sluijs, I., Molina, E., Amiano, P., … Wareham, N. J. (2015). Erratum. Dietary Protein Intake and Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in Europe: The EPIC-InterAct Case-Cohort Study. Diabetes Care 2014;37:1854–1862. Diabetes Care38(10), 1992.3-1992. doi:10.2337/dc15-er10b

unnamed

The Cardiovascular Institute, founded by Uri M. Ben-Zur, M.D., F.A.C.C, is located in the heart of San Fernando Valley in Tarzana, California. In close proximity to, Encino, Sherman Oaks, Burbank, Calabasas and West Hills. Our practice is open to patients and future medical professionals Sunday through Friday starting at 6AMdaily. We are committed to enhancing the quality of healthcare for all of the residents of the Greater Los Angeles area. Dr. Ben-Zur is an attending physician at Providence Tarzana Medical Center. He offers a wide variety of cardiac services. Radiofrequency ablations for cardiac arrhythmias, pacemaker implantation, coronary stent placement and angioplasty are some of the many procedures we specialize in. As an expert onhypertension, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, and arrhythmias, Dr. Ben-Zur is able to diagnose and treat patients in our new state of the art facility. Almost 60 million Americans suffer from hypertension and cardiovascular related diseases. Due to the nature of these diseases, most patients go undiagnosed until it is too late. Diagnosing these diseases early in life can dramatically decrease the risk for future complications. We are always welcoming new patients for heart related screening and have same day appointments available. Additionally, at the Cardiovascular Institute of Tarzana, California, Dr. Ben-Zur’s staff serves patients in multiple languages! Whether it be Hebrew, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Armenian, Tagalog, Hindi, Urdu, and many more the Cardiovascular Institute will often have someone to serve your language and heart health needs.
Our practice is fortified by his acceptance of medical professionals and ultrasound technicians from various organizations including Western University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, and UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and the University of Southern California. The Institute fosters an ideal environment for future physicians and local technicians to help the unique population of the Greater Los Angeles area. Including, Tazana, Encino, Burbank, Sherman OaksWest Hills, and Calabasas.
Dr. Ben-Zur’s past medical education in electrophysiology and angioplasty is unparalleled. Guided by pioneers in both fields early in his career, he has had the opportunity to gain experience in major academic centers in New York City and San Diego, California. Many of his research projects are featured in various medical journals such as The New England Journal of Medicine and The Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Furthermore, Dr. Ben-Zur has multiple publications for his patients to learn more about their health and how they can prevent diseases by improving their lifestyle through diet and exercise. Our newest publication can be found on our website under patient resources!
This holiday season,be mindful of your health. Stress and overindulgence may put your body at risk for serious cardiac problems. A study by the Heart Institute states there are 33% more cardiovascular events from ischemic heart disease in December and January than the rest of the year in Los Angeles County. We advocate for our patients to familiarize themselves with the signs of acute coronary syndrome. The quicker symptoms are recognized, the better the outcomes. We encourage you to explore our website for more information about our practice!

photo-1430933964450-0aefb85717c8

Source: ForksOverKnives

People go plant-based for lots of reasons. These include losing weight, feeling more energetic, reducing the risk of heart disease, decreasing the number of pills they take … there are dozens of great reasons! For even more inspiration, check out these other benefits you can expect when you go plant-based.

1. You’ll reduce inflammation in your body.

If you are eating meat, cheese, and highly processed foods, chances are you have elevated levels of inflammation in your body. While short-term inflammation (such as after an injury) is normal and necessary, inflammation that lasts for months or years is not. Chronic inflammation has been linked to the development of atherosclerosis, heart attacks, strokes, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases, among other conditions.
In contrast, plant-based diets are naturally anti-inflammatory, because they are high in fiber, antioxidants, and other phytonutrients, and much lower in inflammatory triggers like saturated fat and endotoxins (toxins released from bacteria commonly found in animal foods). Studies have shown that people who adopt plant-based diets can dramatically lower their level of C-reactive protein (CRP), an indicator of inflammation in the body.

2. Your blood cholesterol levels will plummet.

Elevated blood cholesterol is a key risk factor for heart disease and strokes, two of the leading killers in the United States. Saturated fat—primarily found in meat, poultry, cheese, and other animal products—is a major driver of our blood cholesterol levels. Cholesterol in our food also plays a role.
Studies consistently show that when people go plant based, their blood cholesterol levels drop by up to 35% . In many cases, the decrease is equal to that seen with drug therapy—with many positive side effects! People who require cholesterol-lowering drugs can further slash their cholesterol levels and cardiovascular risk by adopting a plant-based diet.
Whole-food, plant-based diets reduce blood cholesterol because they tend to be very low in saturated fat and they contain zero cholesterol. Moreover, plant-based diets are high in fiber, which further reduces blood cholesterol levels. Soy has also been shown to play a role in lowering cholesterol, for those who choose to include it.

3. You’ll give your microbiome a makeover.

The trillions of microorganisms living in our bodies are collectively called the microbiome. Increasingly, these microorganisms are recognized as crucial to our overall health: not only do they help us digest our food, but they produce critical nutrients, train our immune systems, turn genes on and off, keep our gut tissue healthy, and help protect us from cancer. Studies have also shown they play a role in obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, autoimmune disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and liver disease.
Plant foods help shape a healthy intestinal microbiome. The fiber in plant foods promotes the growth of “friendly” bacteria in our guts. On the other hand, fiber-poor diets (such as those that are high in dairy, eggs, and meat) can foster the growth of disease-promoting bacteria. Landmark studies have shown that when omnivores eat choline or carnitine (found in meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, and dairy), gut bacteria make a substance that is converted by our liver to a toxic product called TMAO. TMAO leads to worsening cholesterol plaques in our blood vessels and escalates the risk of heart attack and stroke.
Interestingly, people eating plant-based diets make little or no TMAO after a meat-containing meal, because they have a totally different gut microbiome. It takes only a few days for our gut bacterial patterns to change – the benefits of a plant-based diet start quickly!

4. You’ll change your how your genes work.

Scientists have made the remarkable discovery that environmental and lifestyle factors can turn genes on and off. For example, the antioxidants and other nutrients we eat in whole plant foods can change gene expression to optimize how our cells repair damaged DNA. Research has also shown that lifestyle changes, including a plant-based diet, can decrease the expression of cancer genes in men with low-risk prostate cancer. We’ve even seen that a plant-based diet, along with other lifestyle changes, can lengthen our telomeres—the caps at the end of our chromosomes that help keep our DNA stable. This might mean that our cells and tissues age more slowly, since shortened telomeres are associated with aging and earlier death.

5. You’ll dramatically reduce your chances of getting type 2 diabetes.

An estimated 38% of Americans have prediabetes—a precursor to type 2 diabetes. Animal protein, especially red and processed meat, has been shown in study after study to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. In the Adventist population, omnivores have double the rate of diabetes compared with vegans, even accounting for differences in body weight. In fact, in this population, eating meat once a week or more over a 17-year periodincreased the risk of diabetes by 74%! Similarly, in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses Health Study, increasing red meat intake by more than just half a serving per day was associated with a 48% increased risk in diabetes over 4 years.
Why would meat cause type 2 diabetes? Several reasons: animal fat, animal-based (heme) iron, and nitrate preservatives in meat have been found to damage pancreatic cells, worsen inflammation, cause weight gain, and impair the way our insulin functions.
You will dramatically lessen your chances of getting type 2 diabetes by leaving animal products off of your plate and eating a diet based in whole plant foods. This is especially true if you eat whole grains, which are highly protective against type 2 diabetes. You read that right: carbs actually protect you from diabetes! Also, a plant-based diet can improve or even reverse your diabetes if you’ve already been diagnosed.

6. You’ll get the right amount—and the right type—of protein.

The average omnivore in the US gets more than 1.5 times the optimal amount of protein, most of it from animal sources.
Contrary to popular perception, this excess protein does not make us stronger or leaner. Excess protein is stored as fat or turned into waste, and animal protein is a major cause of weight gain, heart disease, diabetes,inflammation, and cancer.
On the other hand, the protein found in whole plant foods protects us from many chronic diseases. There is no need to track protein intake or use protein supplements with plant-based diets; if you are meeting your daily calorie needs, you will get plenty of protein. The longest-lived people on Earth, those living in the “Blue Zones,” get about 10% of their calories from protein, compared with the US average of 15-20%.

7. You’ll make a huge impact on the health of our planet and its inhabitants.

Animal agriculture is extremely destructive to the planet. It is the single largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, and is a leading cause of land and water use, deforestation, wildlife destruction, and species extinction. About 2,000 gallons of water are needed to produce just one pound of beef in the U.S. Our oceans are rapidly becoming depleted of fish; by some estimates, oceans may be fishless by 2048. The current food system, based on meat and dairy production, also contributes to world hunger—the majority of crops grown worldwide go toward feeding livestock, not feeding people.
Equally important, animals raised for food are sentient beings who suffer, whether raised in industrial factory farms or in farms labeled “humane.” Eating a plant-based diet helps us lead a more compassionate life. After all, being healthy is not just about the food we eat; it’s also about our consciousness—our awareness of how our choices affect the planet and all of those with whom we share it.

Sources:

Barbaresko, J., Koch, M., Schulze, M., & Nöthlings, U. (2013). Dietary pattern analysis and biomarkers of low-grade inflammation: A systematic literature review. Nutr Rev Nutrition Reviews, 511-527.
Barnard, N., Levin, S., & Trapp, C. (2014). Meat Consumption as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes. Nutrients, 897-910.
Bøhn, S., Myhrstad, M., Thoresen, M., Holden, M., Karlsen, A., Tunheim, S., . . . Blomhoff, R. (n.d.). Blood cell gene expression associated with cellular stress defense is modulated by antioxidant-rich food in a randomised controlled clinical trial of male smokers. BMC Medicine BMC Med, 54-54.
David, L., Maurice, C., Carmody, R., Gootenberg, D., Button, J., Wolfe, B., . . . Turnbaugh, P. (2013). Diet rapidly and reproducibly alters the human gut microbiome. Nature, 559-563.
Dean, E., & Gormsen Hansen, R. (2012). Prescribing Optimal Nutrition and Physical Activity as “First-Line” Interventions for Best Practice Management of Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation Associated with Osteoarthritis: Evidence Synthesis. Arthritis2012, 1-28. doi:10.1155/2012/560634
Ferdowsian, H., & Barnard, N. (n.d.). Effects of Plant-Based Diets on Plasma Lipids. The American Journal of Cardiology, 947-956.
Goldsmith, J., & Sartor, R. (2014). The role of diet on intestinal microbiota metabolism: Downstream impacts on host immune function and health, and therapeutic implications. Journal of Gastroenterology J Gastroenterol, 785-798.
Halkjær, J., Olsen, A., Overvad, K., Jakobsen, M. U., Boeing, H., Buijsse, B., … Tjønneland, A. (2010). Intake of total, animal and plant protein and subsequent changes in weight or waist circumference in European men and women: the Diogenes project. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord35(8), 1104-1113. doi:10.1038/ijo.2010.254
Huang, T., Yang, B., Zheng, J., Li, G., Wahlqvist, M. L., & Li, D. (2012). Cardiovascular Disease Mortality and Cancer Incidence in Vegetarians: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism60(4), 233-240. doi:10.1159/000337301
Jenkins, D. (2003). Effects of a Dietary Portfolio of Cholesterol-Lowering Foods vs Lovastatin on Serum Lipids and C-Reactive Protein. JAMA, 502-502.
Menke, A., Casagrande, S., Geiss, L., & Cowie, C. (2015). Prevalence of and Trends in Diabetes Among Adults in the United States, 1988-2012. JAMA, 1021-1021.
Ornish, D., Magbanua, M., Weidner, G., Weinberg, V., Kemp, C., Green, C., . . . Carroll, P. (2008). Changes in prostate gene expression in men undergoing an intensive nutrition and lifestyle intervention. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 8369-8374.
Ornish, D., Lin, J., Chan, J., Epel, E., Kemp, C., Weidner, G., . . . Blackburn, E. (n.d.). Effect of comprehensive lifestyle changes on telomerase activity and telomere length in men with biopsy-proven low-risk prostate cancer: 5-year follow-up of a descriptive pilot study. The Lancet Oncology, 1112-1120.
Tonstad, S., Butler, T., Yan, R., & Fraser, G. (2009). Type of Vegetarian Diet, Body Weight, and Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Care, 791-796.
Pan, A., Sun, Q., Bernstein, A. M., Manson, J. E., Willett, W. C., & Hu, F. B. (2013). Changes in Red Meat Consumption and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. JAMA Internal Medicine173(14), 1328. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.6633
Sutliffe, J., Wilson, L., Heer, H., Foster, R., & Carnot, M. (n.d.). C-reactive protein response to a vegan lifestyle intervention. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 32-37.
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HISTORY: 60 yo m PMH a-fib and a-flutter s/p ablation and pulmonary venous isolation on 10/16/13, s/p CVA, Hx of HTN. Patient on Xarelto. Didn’t tolerate amiodarone and has low blood pressures with minimal medical therapy. Recurrent episodes of palpitations despite medical therapy. Last episode of palpitations on 01/13/15 s/p DCCV on 01/14/15. Patient wished to undergo ablation. Currently denies any cardiac symptoms. EKG on 01/23/15 – Rhythm: A -Flutter with atrial rate 254 bpm and V rate of 123 bpm; occasional VPCs, likely left atrial flutter ECHO: LVEF > 65%, RSVP 34 mmHg, mild mitral valve regurgitation, dilated left atrium at 4.3cm. Meds: Bystolic 5 mg ½ tab QPM, Cardizem 120mg 1 tab daily, and Xarelto 20 mg 1 tab daily No hx of smoking. No EtOH. Occasional marijuana use. Vegan diet. Holding off on exercise due to palpitations.

PROCEDURE: Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation Cardiac ablation is a procedure that uses RF energy to scar small areas in the heart that may be causing abnormal electrical signals or rhythms from moving through the heart. Typical a-flutter is found at the isthmus which is located where the tricuspid and IVC meet. Atypical a-flutter found on the mitral annulus and the ridge between the L appendage and L pulmonary veins.

RAF1

Echocardiogram Flouroscopy Duadecca cath Access femoral vein → IVC → RA → coronary sinus. Maps the electrical signals to determine area causing afib Transeptal cath Creates opening between RA and LA, allows Lasso and ablation cath to enter the LA. Lasso cath – for 3-dimensional mapping of the electrical circuit Ablation cath – delivers energy to ablate area of interest by burning tissue causing the arrhythmia. Differentiated between focal vs reentry tachycardia based on mapping and color gradient. Focal has a red hot spot that spreads out to other sites of the heart. Reentry tachy circuits in a loop back to the originating point Ablation at the hot spot and around the mitral annulus.

RAF2

Fractionated rhythm was found around initially at the ridge But testing in between ablation areas found a leak From the ridge and around the left atrial appendage Ablation was made from left atrial appendage to mitral annulus Complications of Cardiac Ablation ● Cardio-esophageal fistula. Risk reduced with intracardiac echo . ● Pulmonary hypertension due to pulmonary vein stenosis ● Bleeding or infection at the site where your catheter was inserted ● Vascular injury (2-4%) ● Cardiac trauma including perforation, MI, tamponade, coronary artery dissection, valvular damage, or embolism (1-2%) ● Damage to your heart’s electrical system, which could worsen your arrhythmia and require a pacemaker to correct (1-2%) ● Blood clots in the legs or lungs (venous thromboembolism) (<1%) ● Stroke or heart attack ● Damage to your kidneys from dye used during the procedure ● Radiation exposure ● Death in rare cases (approximately 0.1-0.3%)

 

Dr. Ben-Zur is a cardiologist who sees patients from Burbank, Encino, Sun Valley, Beverly Hills, Brentwood, Marina del Rey, Inglewood, El Segundo, Manhattan Beach, Redondo Beach, Torrance, Hollywood, Bel Air, Malibu, Calabasas, Saratoga Hills, Agoura hills, Thousand Oaks, Sherman Oaks, Studio City, Simi Valley, West Hills, Reseda, and Oak Park. He sees patients with all types of heart disease, including atrial fibrillation, a-fib, AF, sick sinus syndrome, av block, heart block, arrythmias, ischemia, congestive heart failure. He places pacemakers, defibrillators, implantable cardiac defibrillators. Bi-ventricular pacing. Palpitations, chest pain.


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